Vineyard Library

Summer is the time for pop-up libraries. I love how they help us re-envisage what a library can be, how they play with architecture and space, and how fun they always are.

Here’s a wonderful one from last summer created by Massimo Bartolini for Project TRACK (you can read more about it here: http://track.be)

Set in the vineyard at St Peter’s Abbey in the city of Ghent, Bartolini’s library mimics a vineyard; the shelves reminiscent of the vines themselves. As with any pop-up library, visitors could borrow a book, buy a book, or exchange one.

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all photo credits: track.be

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Hopefully, they provided some wine as well!

78 thoughts on “Vineyard Library

  1. My I would love to be there right now, first grab a book and then get some wine to read and have a picnic like the couple in the first picture ( I think is couple). I love this idea so much!

  2. Now this is more to my liking than the beach library you posted about before. At least there’s no sand sneaking into my shoes here! 😉

  3. I love your vine yard library! A book and a glass of wine, taken in the shadow of a nearby
    Tree….! Sounds lovely!
    So many different libraries! People love reading!
    Francoise

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    • I hadn’t though of this, but you are so right Walter- the idea that the books themselves are metaphors for the grapes and wine that feed our bodies and souls! Wonderful!

  6. What a beautiful library to experience. It’s fascinating how it reverses our usual idea of a library. Here the books are exposed and out in the open and part of the world whereas we usually have our books tucked away in a special building ( a monument to books sometimes) almost hidden from the world. Exposed in every sense! Do they allow the books to get wet if it rains?

    • I always wonder about rain with these open air libraries too. I imagine they have some kind of system in place, perhaps with tarps?

      But, I agree, the accessibility, is so interesting and so different from our usual understanding of a library.

  7. Every single post of yours comes up with something I have never seen, or thought of. How come you do it this consistently? You must have an eye for such creative reading spaces.

    This looks amazing! Nothing better than mild alcohol and a book of poetry. Absolute bliss 🙂

    • Thank you, Tatsat, I could say the same of you!

      I love that this artist embraced the history and layout of the environment to create his project- so creative.

  8. That would be fantastic in nice weather, have a browse, bring a picnic and get your literature rush. Beats vines for wine, we should grow books, after all they don’t grow on trees(!)

  9. Outdoors, sunshine, books, and wine sounds like the perfect combination to me! I’ve never heard of anything like this, but it looks like so much fun. I might just have to move there.

    • It’s so exciting to see different creative projects around books and libraries, isn’t it? Especially when reading is such a solitary act, these projects bring book lovers together. Thanks for dropping by and commenting!

  10. I have never seen an outdoor library and this looks like the perfect place to spend a summer afternoon 🙂 Annie

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  12. i can imagine when libraries pop up in spots like this, it just attracts readers. They come out of the woodwork, so to speak. I’d love to bring a book to it, leave it and bring home something new.

  13. You’ve done it again…found a creative library to share with us…like the IKEA library at the beach. Fresh air and green grass amongst the most literate of vineyards. Lovely.

  14. I’ve really missed your gorgeous posts, during my internet holiday, and feel lucky to not have missed this one!! You’ve got such an eye for intriguing things, and I always value what you bring my attention to. Good to be back 😉

  15. Up and down the rows I go. I pick up this book – they said it was the best year for Chardonnay. Back and for I go – my hands hover a Grand Cru. Now this would be memorable. Some thing that travels well, perhaps this Malbec. So many choices. I could celebrate with this sparkling Champagne. Each volume I touch has the wonderful promise of the excitement found in a bottle of excellent wine. Books/bottles to linger over long into the twilight. Then one book calls my name and I hurry home. … to a plate of strawberries, some brie and my delicious book. V.

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